Rod Stewart Albums in Order

The List of Rod Stewart Albums in Order of Release Date

Rod Stewart Albums in Order: Having sold 250 million records worldwide, including 37 million in the United States and 14 million in the United Kingdom, Rod Stewart is one of the world’s best-selling music artists in history. He released 32 studio albums, 4 live albums, 22 compilation albums, 13 video albums, 68 Music videos and 147 singles.

Rod Stewart has been lauded as the finest singer of his generation; written songs that turned into modern standards; sung with the Faces, and had massive commercial success. He’s one of rock & roll’s best interpretive singers, as well as an innovative songwriter whose work created a raw, loose, and charming combination of folk, rock, blues, and country. After Stewart became successful, he started to lose the rootsier elements of his music, adapting his style to suit the times, leading to smash hits in the disco, new wave, and MTV eras.

Stewart eased into his status as a veteran singer by releasing a series of albums where he crooned The Great American Songbook, but returned to original material with 2013’s Time. The record began another act for the rocker, where he wrote new songs that incorporated modern sounds, a combination that informed such albums as 2021’s The Tears of Hercules. So, if you are a die heart fan of Rod Stewart Albums then check out here we have list of Rod Stewart albums in order of release so far.

 

All Rod Stewart Albums Available on: Apple Music

 

All Rod Stewart Studio Albums in Order of Release Date


1. An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down (1969)

“An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down,” Rod Stewart’s inaugural solo venture, marked a significant departure from his previous work with the Jeff Beck Group and showcased his distinctive raspy voice. Released in 1969, initially titled ‘The Rod Stewart Album’ in the US, it blended folk, rock, and blues elements in a compelling fashion. The album opens with a spirited rendition of the Rolling Stones’ “Street Fighting Man,” setting a lively tone. Stewart’s interpretation of traditional songs like “Man of Constant Sorrow” and “Dirty Old Town” exudes a raw authenticity. Meanwhile, tracks like “Handbags and Gladrags” and the title track showcase Stewart’s songwriting prowess. With its eclectic mix of covers and originals, this album laid the foundation for Stewart’s illustrious solo career, making it a cornerstone in his musical legacy. The album’s timeless quality endures, solidifying its place in rock history.

 

2. Gasoline Alley (1970)

“Gasoline Alley,” Rod Stewart’s second solo album, released in 1970, is a masterful blend of rock, folk, and blues. With contributions from Ronnie Wood, this album exudes a raw, unfiltered musical energy. The title track, “Gasoline Alley,” sets the tone with its gritty, soulful sound. Stewart’s renditions of classics like Bob Dylan’s “Only a Hobo” and Steve Marriott’s “My Way of Giving” showcase his interpretative prowess. Elton John and Bernie Taupin’s “Country Comfort” receives a heartfelt treatment, while “Cut Across Shorty” displays Stewart’s dynamic vocal range. Stewart’s original compositions, including “Lady Day” and “Jo’s Lament,” add a personal touch to the album. The inclusion of the bonus track, a single version of “It’s All Over Now,” adds an extra layer of depth. “Gasoline Alley” stands as a testament to Stewart’s musical dexterity and remains a cornerstone of his celebrated career.

 

3. Every Picture Tells a Story (1971)

“Every Picture Tells a Story,” Rod Stewart’s third studio album released in 1971, is a magnum opus in the realm of folk-rock. Stewart’s collaboration with Ronnie Wood shines throughout the album, evident in the title track’s infectious energy. “Seems Like a Long Time” exudes a poignant, introspective mood, while the medley of “That’s All Right / Amazing Grace” showcases Stewart’s ability to blend genres seamlessly. Bob Dylan’s “Tomorrow Is a Long Time” receives a soulful interpretation, adding a unique dimension to the album. The short instrumental piece, “Henry,” provides a delicate interlude before the iconic “Maggie May” takes center stage, becoming a timeless classic. “Mandolin Wind” and the dynamic “(I Know) I’m Losing You” further display Stewart’s vocal prowess. The album concludes on a poignant note with Tim Hardin’s “(Find a) Reason to Believe.” Clocking in at 40 minutes, “Every Picture Tells a Story” remains a cornerstone of Stewart’s illustrious career.

 

4. Never a Dull Moment (1972)

“Never a Dull Moment,” Rod Stewart’s fourth studio album, released in 1972, is a vibrant tapestry of rock and folk influences. Stewart’s collaboration with Ronnie Wood once again proves fruitful, evident in tracks like “True Blue” and “Lost Paraguayos” which showcase their musical chemistry. Bob Dylan’s “Mama, You Been on My Mind” receives a soulful rendition, while the playful “Italian Girls” adds a dynamic flair. The inclusion of Jimi Hendrix’s “Angel” brings a touch of rock royalty to the album. A brief interlude by Art Wood provides a moment of reflection before the iconic “You Wear It Well” takes center stage. Stewart’s cover of “I’d Rather Go Blind” is a poignant highlight, while Sam Cooke’s “Twistin’ the Night Away” ends the album on a high note. Clocking in at 32 minutes, “Never a Dull Moment” is a testament to Stewart’s enduring musical prowess.

 

5. Smiler (1974)

“Smiler,” Rod Stewart’s fifth studio album released in 1974, presents a diverse collection of songs that traverse various genres. Stewart’s distinctive voice shines in tracks like “Sweet Little Rock ‘n’ Roller” and the tender “Farewell,” co-written with Martin Quittenton. Collaborative efforts with Ronnie Wood yield gems like “Sailor” and “Dixie Toot,” showcasing their musical camaraderie. The medley of Sam Cooke’s classics, “Bring It On Home to Me/You Send Me,” demonstrates Stewart’s interpretive prowess. A standout moment arrives with Elton John and Bernie Taupin’s “Let Me Be Your Car,” blending Stewart’s rock sensibilities with a touch of Elton’s flair. Stewart’s rendition of “Girl from the North Country” by Bob Dylan exudes a heartfelt sincerity. With its eclectic mix of covers and originals, “Smiler” stands as a testament to Stewart’s versatility as an artist, offering a dynamic listening experience.

 

6. Atlantic Crossing (1975)

“Atlantic Crossing,” released in 1975, marked a pivotal moment in Rod Stewart’s career. Departing from his earlier blues-rock sound, the album embraced a more polished, pop-oriented approach. Stewart’s songwriting talents shine through in tracks like “Three Time Loser” and the soulful “All in the Name of Rock ‘N’ Roll.” The heartfelt rendition of “Drift Away” showcases Stewart’s ability to make a song uniquely his own. “Sailing,” an emblematic track from the album, became a signature song for Stewart, capturing a sense of yearning and wanderlust. The 2009 re-release offers additional versions, providing a fascinating glimpse into the creative process. “Atlantic Crossing” stands as a testament to Stewart’s versatility as an artist and his ability to evolve with the musical landscape.

 

7. A Night on the Town (1976)

“A Night on the Town,” released in 1976, showcased Rod Stewart’s continued evolution as a versatile artist. The album’s cover, inspired by Renoir’s painting, reflects the period’s elegance. The iconic “Tonight’s the Night (Gonna Be Alright)” became a chart-topper and a staple in Stewart’s repertoire. Cat Stevens’ “The First Cut Is the Deepest” receives Stewart’s soulful treatment, while self-penned tracks like “Fool for You” demonstrate his songwriting prowess. The poignant “The Killing of Georgie (Part I and II)” showcases Stewart’s storytelling abilities. The ‘Fast Side’ boasts a vibrant energy with tracks like “The Balltrap” and the cover of “Pretty Flamingo.” “A Night on the Town” remains a testament to Stewart’s ability to blend rock, pop, and soul into a cohesive and memorable album. The 2009 re-release offers additional insights into the creative process, making it a must-have for fans.

 

8. Foot Loose & Fancy Free (1977)

“Foot Loose & Fancy Free,” released in November 1977, showcases Rod Stewart at the height of his rock ‘n’ roll prowess. The album kicks off with the iconic “Hot Legs,” a lively track with Stewart’s signature raspy vocals. “You’re Insane” and the heartfelt “You’re in My Heart (The Final Acclaim)” demonstrate Stewart’s lyrical depth. “Born Loose” exudes a free-spirited energy, complemented by dynamic guitar work. The album takes a soulful turn with a cover of The Supremes’ “You Keep Me Hangin’ On,” showcasing Stewart’s versatile vocal range. Luther Ingram’s “(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don’t Want to Be Right” receives a soulful interpretation. “You Got a Nerve” and the introspective “I Was Only Joking” round off the album with Stewart’s trademark storytelling. “Foot Loose & Fancy Free” is a testament to Stewart’s ability to blend rock, soul, and introspection into an unforgettable musical journey.

 

9. Blondes Have More Fun (1978)

“Blondes Have More Fun,” released in November 1978, marks a spirited chapter in Rod Stewart’s discography. The album kicks off with the infectious hit “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy?” – a disco-infused track that became a chart-topping sensation. The album maintains its vivacious energy with tracks like “Dirty Weekend” and the sassy “Ain’t Love a Bitch.” Stewart’s introspective side surfaces in songs like “The Best Days of My Life” and “Is That the Thanks I Get?”. “Attractive Female Wanted” and the title track, “Blondes (Have More Fun),” further showcase Stewart’s ability to craft catchy, memorable tunes. The album’s closing tracks, including “Standin’ in the Shadows of Love” and “Scarred and Scared,” provide a fitting conclusion to this lively musical journey. “Blondes Have More Fun” encapsulates the exuberance and versatility that define Stewart’s enduring appeal.

 

10. Foolish Behaviour (1980)

Released in November 1980, “Foolish Behaviour” marked Rod Stewart’s tenth studio album. The record showcases Stewart’s ability to blend rock with pop sensibilities. The album kicks off with “Better off Dead,” a reflective piece with poignant lyrics. “Passion” stands out with its infectious melody and Stewart’s distinctive vocals. The title track, “Foolish Behaviour,” is a dynamic rock anthem. “So Soon We Change” offers a mellow introspection, displaying Stewart’s lyrical depth. The album’s second half maintains its vigor with tracks like “Gi’ Me Wings” and the upbeat “My Girl.” Stewart’s rendition of Jorge Ben’s “She Won’t Dance with Me” infuses a touch of Latin flair. “Foolish Behaviour” is a testament to Stewart’s enduring ability to create engaging and diverse musical experiences.

 

11. Tonight I’m Yours (1981)

“Tonight I’m Yours,” released in 1981, showcases Rod Stewart’s continued musical evolution. The album opens with the title track, “Tonight I’m Yours (Don’t Hurt Me),” a lively rock anthem that sets the tone for the record. Stewart’s cover of Paul Carrack’s “How Long” infuses a fresh energy into the song. The infectious “Tora, Tora, Tora (Out With The Boys)” exudes a playful rock ‘n’ roll spirit. “Just Like a Woman” presents Stewart’s distinctive take on Bob Dylan’s classic. The album’s standout track, “Young Turks,” became an instant hit, blending rock with a vibrant pop sensibility. Stewart’s collaboration with Bernie Taupin on “Sonny” adds a personal touch. “Never Give Up on a Dream” concludes the album with a message of hope and determination. “Tonight I’m Yours” is a testament to Stewart’s ability to create music that resonates across generations.

 

12. Body Wishes (1983)

“Body Wishes,” released in 1983, showcases Rod Stewart’s foray into a more contemporary sound, embracing the musical landscape of the era. The album opens with “Dancin’ Alone,” a dynamic track that sets the tone with its infectious rhythm. “Baby Jane” stands out as a hit single, blending Stewart’s signature vocals with a catchy melody. “Body Wishes,” the title track, exudes a vibrant energy with its rock-infused sound. Stewart’s soulful side surfaces in tracks like “Sweet Surrender” and “What Am I Gonna Do (I’m So in Love with You).” The album’s diversity is highlighted in songs like “Ghetto Blaster,” which infuses a touch of funk. “Body Wishes” is a testament to Stewart’s ability to adapt to evolving musical trends while maintaining his distinctive style.

 

13. Camouflage (1984)

“Camouflage,” released in 1984, showcases Rod Stewart’s venture into a contemporary sound with a mix of rock and pop. The album opens with the energetic “Infatuation,” setting a dynamic tone. Stewart’s rendition of “All Right Now” pays homage to the rock classic, infused with his distinctive style. The album’s standout track, “Some Guys Have All the Luck,” became a chart-topping hit, combining catchy melodies with Stewart’s signature vocals. “Can We Still Be Friends” offers a more introspective moment, showcasing Stewart’s emotional depth. “Camouflage,” the title track, presents a vibrant blend of rock and pop elements. The album closes with the soulful “Trouble,” showcasing Stewart’s enduring vocal prowess. “Camouflage” stands as a testament to Stewart’s ability to adapt and thrive in evolving musical landscapes.

 

14. Every Beat of My Heart (1986)

“Every Beat of My Heart,” released in 1986, captures Rod Stewart in a phase of musical exploration. The album opens with the sweeping ballad “Here to Eternity,” showcasing Stewart’s emotive vocals. Collaborative efforts with Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance give birth to the soulful “Another Heartache.” Stewart’s introspective side emerges in tracks like “A Night Like This” and the poignant “Who’s Gonna Take Me Home.” “Red Hot in Black” adds a rock ‘n’ roll edge to the album. The infectious “Love Touch” exhibits Stewart’s knack for crafting catchy tunes. “Every Beat of My Heart,” the title track, showcases Stewart’s lyrical prowess. The album concludes on a reflective note with a cover of The Beatles’ “In My Life.” “Every Beat of My Heart” is a testament to Stewart’s ability to navigate diverse musical territories with his signature style.

 

15. Out of Order (1988)

“Out of Order,” released in 1988, marks another notable chapter in Rod Stewart’s illustrious career. The album commences with “Lost in You,” a track that showcases Stewart’s emotive vocals. “The Wild Horse” exudes a rock ‘n’ roll spirit, while “Lethal Dose of Love” adds an edgy flair to the collection. The album’s standout moment comes with “Forever Young,” a poignant ballad that resonates deeply with listeners. Stewart’s rendition of “My Heart Can’t Tell You No” reflects his ability to infuse emotion into every note. “Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out” provides a soulful interlude, while “Crazy About Her” brings a lively rock vibe. Stewart’s cover of “Try a Little Tenderness” showcases his mastery over classic tunes. “Out of Order” is a testament to Stewart’s enduring ability to captivate audiences with his distinctive sound.

 

16. Vagabond Heart (1991)

“Vagabond Heart,” released in 1991, showcases Rod Stewart’s enduring artistry and versatility. The album opens with the spirited “Rhythm of My Heart,” setting a lively tone. “Rebel Heart” exudes rock ‘n’ roll energy, while “Broken Arrow” brings a soulful, contemplative touch. The duet with Tina Turner on “It Takes Two” delivers a powerful vocal performance. “When a Man’s in Love” showcases Stewart’s songwriting prowess, blending heartfelt lyrics with a captivating melody. Stewart’s rendition of “You Are Everything” offers a poignant moment of reflection. “The Motown Song” adds a nostalgic flair, while “No Holding Back” reveals Stewart’s rock roots. The album’s standout track, “Have I Told You Lately,” became an enduring classic. “Vagabond Heart” is a testament to Stewart’s ability to create music that resonates deeply with audiences.

 

17. A Spanner in the Works (1995)

“A Spanner in the Works,” released in 1995, showcases Rod Stewart’s continued musical prowess. The album opens with “Windy Town,” a soulful track with Chris Rea’s signature touch. Stewart’s rendition of “The Downtown Lights” brings a captivating, atmospheric quality. “Leave Virginia Alone” showcases Stewart’s ability to infuse emotion into Tom Petty’s composition. The album takes a folk-inspired turn with “Sweetheart Like You,” highlighting Stewart’s versatility. “This” offers a reflective moment, beautifully crafted by John Capek and Marc Jordan. The bluesy “Lady Luck” demonstrates Stewart’s mastery over various genres. “You’re the Star” presents a melodic, radio-friendly sound, while “Muddy, Sam and Otis” adds a rock-infused edge. Stewart’s rendition of Tom Waits’ “Hang on St. Christopher” infuses the album with a gritty intensity. “A Spanner in the Works” stands as a testament to Stewart’s ability to interpret and make every song uniquely his own.

 

18. When We Were the New Boys (1998)

“When We Were the New Boys,” released in 1998, is a spirited reflection on youth and memories. Rod Stewart infuses his signature style into each track, creating a vibrant musical experience. The album opens with a cover of Noel Gallagher’s “Cigarettes and Alcohol,” showcasing Stewart’s rock sensibilities. “Ooh La La” brings a touch of nostalgia with its Ron Wood and Ronnie Lane composition. “Rocks” exudes a lively energy with contributions from Bobby Gillespie, Andrew Innes, and Robert Young. Stewart’s rendition of “Superstar” adds a soulful dimension to the collection. “Secret Heart” offers a heartfelt moment, beautifully penned by Ron Sexsmith. The album also features standout tracks like “Hotel Chambermaid” and “Shelly My Love,” each showcasing Stewart’s interpretive prowess. “When We Were the New Boys” is a testament to Stewart’s enduring ability to connect with audiences through his music.

 

19. Human (2001)

“Human,” released in 2001, marks Rod Stewart’s nineteenth studio album, showcasing a contemporary sound with a blend of soulful tracks. The title track, “Human,” penned by Karl Gordon and Conner Reeves, offers a smooth and reflective start to the album. Stewart’s collaboration with Helicopter Girl on “Don’t Come Around Here” adds a unique dimension, while tracks like “Soul on Soul” and “Loveless” demonstrate Stewart’s ability to infuse emotion into every note. The album features a diverse range of compositions, including the poignant “Charlie Parker Loves Me” and the soulful rendition of Curtis Mayfield’s “It Was Love That We Needed.” With “Human,” Rod Stewart demonstrates his adaptability and enduring talent in the music industry.

 

20. It Had to Be You: The Great American Songbook (2002)

“It Had to Be You: The Great American Songbook,” released in 2002, marks Rod Stewart’s foray into American pop standards. This album, his 20th, showcases Stewart’s timeless vocals on classic tracks. From the wistful “You Go to My Head” to the romantic “The Way You Look Tonight,” each song is masterfully interpreted. Stewart’s rendition of “It Had to Be You” exudes nostalgia, while “These Foolish Things” carries emotional depth. The album is a tribute to the golden era of American music, with highlights including the tender “I’ll Be Seeing You” and the evocative “The Nearness of You.” “It Had to Be You” is a testament to Stewart’s versatility and enduring appeal across musical genres.

 

21. As Time Goes By: The Great American Songbook, Volume II (2003)

“As Time Goes By: The Great American Songbook, Volume II,” released in 2003, is Rod Stewart’s second venture into timeless pop standards, following the success of his first volume. This album, his 21st, showcases Stewart’s impeccable ability to interpret these classics with finesse. From the evocative “Time After Time” to the enchanting duet “Bewitched, Bothered & Bewildered” with Cher, each track is treated with reverence. Stewart’s collaboration with Queen Latifah on “As Time Goes By” adds a contemporary twist. The album’s emotive core is highlighted by renditions of “Smile” and “Someone to Watch Over Me.” Stewart’s continued exploration of the Great American Songbook is a testament to his enduring musical legacy.

 

22. Stardust: The Great American Songbook, Volume III (2004)

“Stardust: The Great American Songbook, Volume III,” released in 2004, marks Rod Stewart’s continued journey into the heart of classic American music. Collaborating with iconic artists like Eric Clapton, Stevie Wonder, Bette Midler, and Dolly Parton, Stewart brings a fresh vibrancy to these timeless tunes. From the soulful rendition of “What a Wonderful World” to the tender duet “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” with Dolly Parton, each track is a testament to Stewart’s interpretative prowess. The album also features Stewart’s charming duet with Bette Midler on “Manhattan.” With its seamless blend of Stewart’s distinctive voice and these beloved classics, “Stardust: The Great American Songbook, Volume III” is a captivating continuation of a musical legacy.

 

23. Thanks for the Memory: The Great American Songbook, Volume IV (2005)

“Thanks for the Memory: The Great American Songbook, Volume IV,” released in 2005, continues Rod Stewart’s exploration of classic American standards. Collaborating with legendary artists like Diana Ross, Chaka Khan, Elton John, and George Benson, Stewart brings a fresh interpretation to these timeless songs. The album opens with the enchanting duet “I’ve Got a Crush on You” with Diana Ross, setting the tone for a collection filled with romance and nostalgia. From the soulful rendition of “You Send Me” with Chaka Khan to the playful “Makin’ Whoopee” with Elton John, each track showcases Stewart’s magnetic vocal style. With its star-studded collaborations and heartfelt renditions, “Thanks for the Memory: The Great American Songbook, Volume IV” stands as a testament to Stewart’s enduring artistry.

 

24. Still the Same… Great Rock Classics of Our Time (2006)

“Still the Same… Great Rock Classics of Our Time,” released in 2006, showcases Rod Stewart’s talent for reimagining iconic rock hits. Stewart’s distinctive voice breathes new life into tracks like John Fogerty’s “Have You Ever Seen the Rain?” and Elvin Bishop’s “Fooled Around and Fell in Love.” The album also features heartfelt renditions of classics like “I’ll Stand by You” and “Father and Son,” demonstrating Stewart’s emotional depth as an interpreter. With each track, Stewart pays homage to the original artists while infusing his own style into the arrangements. From the soulful “Love Hurts” to the upbeat “Day After Day,” this collection stands as a testament to Stewart’s enduring ability to captivate audiences with his timeless sound.

 

25. Soulbook (2009)

“Soulbook,” Rod Stewart’s 25th studio album, pays homage to the Motown and soul classics that have left an indelible mark on music history. With soulful renditions of iconic songs, Stewart’s distinctive voice lends a fresh perspective to timeless tracks. Collaborations with music legends like Stevie Wonder, Mary J. Blige, Smokey Robinson, and Jennifer Hudson add depth to the album. From the upbeat “Love Train” to the heartfelt “Tracks of My Tears,” each song is delivered with Stewart’s signature flair and genuine emotion. “Soulbook” stands as a testament to Stewart’s ability to transcend genres and make these beloved classics uniquely his own. It’s a compelling collection that bridges generations and showcases the enduring power of soulful music.

 

26. Once in a Blue Moon: The Lost Album (2010)

 

 

 

27. Fly Me to the Moon… The Great American Songbook Volume V (2010)

“Fly Me to the Moon… The Great American Songbook Volume V” is the fifth installment in Rod Stewart’s celebrated series of pop standards. Released on 19 October 2010, this album showcases Stewart’s exceptional talent for reinterpreting timeless classics. From the enchanting “Fly Me to the Moon” to the evocative “Moon River,” each track is delivered with Stewart’s signature charm and heartfelt emotion. His renditions of beloved songs like “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” and “What a Difference a Day Makes” pay homage to the golden era of American music. The limited edition bonus CD offers listeners even more cherished standards, making this album a comprehensive and delightful tribute to the Great American Songbook.

 

28. Merry Christmas, Baby (2012)

“Merry Christmas, Baby” is Rod Stewart’s heartwarming tribute to the holiday season and his 27th studio album, released on 30 October 2012. Stewart lends his distinctive voice to a collection of beloved Christmas classics, infusing them with his signature style and warmth. From the nostalgic “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” to the jolly “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town,” each track is delivered with heartfelt emotion. Special guest appearances by artists like Michael Bublé, CeeLo Green, and Ella Fitzgerald add extra sparkle to the festivities. With timeless tunes like “White Christmas” and “Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!” this album is a delightful addition to any holiday music collection. The deluxe edition features even more cherished holiday songs, making it a perfect soundtrack for the season.

 

29. Time (2013)

“Time,” Rod Stewart’s twenty-eighth studio album, released in 2013, marks a poignant return to his songwriting roots. The album showcases a blend of heartfelt lyrics and rock-infused melodies that resonate with Stewart’s iconic style. Tracks like “She Makes Me Happy” and “Can’t Stop Me Now” are spirited anthems celebrating life’s joys, while songs like “It’s Over” and “Picture in a Frame” reveal a more introspective side. “Time” is not just an album, but a reflection of Stewart’s journey, featuring a mix of original compositions and covers. The deluxe edition, with live renditions of classic hits, offers a special treat for fans. It’s a testament to Stewart’s enduring talent and his ability to connect with audiences through the power of music.

 

30. Another Country (2015)

“Another Country,” Rod Stewart’s 29th studio album, released in 2015, showcases the enduring talent of this iconic singer-songwriter. The album is a blend of heartfelt ballads and spirited anthems, featuring Stewart’s distinctive raspy vocals. Tracks like “Love Is” and “Please” capture the essence of love and longing, while “Walking in the Sunshine” exudes positivity and warmth. Stewart’s songwriting prowess shines through in tracks like “Way Back Home” and “A Friend for Life,” offering listeners a glimpse into his introspective side. The deluxe version treats fans to additional gems, including the classic “In a Broken Dream” featuring Python Lee Jackson. “Another Country” is a testament to Stewart’s ability to craft timeless music that resonates across generations.

 

31. Blood Red Roses (2018)

“Blood Red Roses,” Rod Stewart’s 30th studio album released in 2018, is a captivating blend of introspective ballads and energetic tracks. Stewart’s raspy, emotive vocals take center stage in songs like “Look in Her Eyes” and “Farewell,” exploring themes of love and parting. The album’s title track, “Blood Red Roses,” carries a poignant narrative, showcasing Stewart’s storytelling prowess. Tracks like “Hole in My Heart” and “Give Me Love” add a rock-infused vigor to the collection. The deluxe version features bonus tracks like “Who Designed the Snowflake” and a refreshing rendition of “It Was a Very Good Year.” With its rich lyricism and Stewart’s unmistakable voice, “Blood Red Roses” is a testament to the enduring artistry of this music legend.

 

32. The Tears of Hercules (2021)

“The Tears of Hercules,” Rod Stewart’s thirty-second studio album released in 2021, showcases his enduring artistry and songwriting prowess. The album combines Stewart’s distinct vocals with a blend of rock, soul, and pop elements. Tracks like “One More Time” and “Gabriella” evoke a sense of nostalgia, while “Some Kind of Wonderful” and “Born to Boogie” infuse the album with a lively, rock-inspired energy. The title track, “The Tears of Hercules,” stands out with its emotive lyrics and rich musical arrangement. Stewart’s tribute to Johnny Cash in “These Are My People” adds a heartfelt touch. With its diverse range of songs and Stewart’s timeless voice, this album is a testament to his enduring musical legacy.

 


Rod Stewart Wallpaper

How many albums does Rod Stewart have?

The following is the complete discography of British singer Rod Stewart. He released THIRTY-TWO studio albums, FOUR live albums, TWENTY-TWO compilation albums, THIRTEEN video albums, SIXTY-EIGHT Music videos and ONE HUNDRED FOURTY-SEVEN singles.

 

List of Rod Stewart Albums in Order of Release Date

The List of List of Rod Stewart Albums in Order of Release Here!

Studio albums:

1. An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down — November 1969 (US), February 1970 (UK)

2. Gasoline Alley — 12 June 1970

3. Every Picture Tells a Story — 28 May 1971

4. Never a Dull Moment — 21 July 1972

5. Smiler — 4 October 1974

6. Atlantic Crossing — 15 August 1975

7. A Night on the Town — 18 June 1976

8. Foot Loose & Fancy Free — 4 November 1977

9. Blondes Have More Fun — 24 November 1978

10. Foolish Behaviour — 21 November 1980

11. Tonight I’m Yours — 6 November 1981

12. Body Wishes — 10 June 1983

13. Camouflage — 8 June 1984

14. Every Beat of My Heart — 23 June 1986

15. Out of Order — 23 May 1988

16. Vagabond Heart — 26 March 1991

17. A Spanner in the Works — 29 May 1995

18. When We Were the New Boys — 29 May 1998

19. Human — 12 March 2001

20. It Had to Be You: The Great American Songbook — 22 October 2002

21. As Time Goes By: The Great American Songbook, Volume II — 14 October 2003

22. Stardust: The Great American Songbook, Volume III — 19 October 2004

23. Thanks for the Memory: The Great American Songbook, Volume IV — 18 October 2005

24. Still the Same… Great Rock Classics of Our Time — 10 October 2006

25. Soulbook — 17 October 2009

26. Once in a Blue Moon: The Lost Album — 2010

27. Fly Me to the Moon… The Great American Songbook Volume V —19 October 2010

28. Merry Christmas, Baby — 30 October 2012

29. Time — 3 May 2013 (UK), 7 May 2013 (US & Canada)

30. Another Country — 23 October 2015

31. Blood Red Roses — 28 September 2018

32. The Tears of Hercules — 12 November 2021

 

Live albums:

1. Coast to Coast: Overture and Beginners Credited to Rod Stewart/Face 1974,

2. Absolutely Live1982,

3. Unplugged…and Seated — 1993,

4. Live 1976–1998: Tonight’s the Night 2014

 

Compilation albums:

1. Sing It Again Rod — 1973

2. The Best of Rod Stewart — 1976

3. The Best of Rod Stewart Vol. 2 — 1976

4. Greatest Hits, Vol. 1 — 1979

5. The Best of Rod Stewart — 1989

6. Storyteller – The Complete Anthology: 1964–1990 — 1989

7. Downtown Train – Selections from the Storyteller Anthology — 1990

8. The Mercury Anthology — 1992

9. Lead Vocalist 22 February, 1993

10. If We Fall in Love Tonight 12 November, 1996

11. Reason to Believe — 1999

12. A Little Misunderstood, The Sixties Sessions — 2001

13. The Story So Far: The Very Best of Rod Stewart — 2001

14. Reason to Believe: The Complete Mercury Studio Recordings — 2002

15. Encore: The Very Best Of – Vol. 2 — 2003

16. Changing Faces – The Very Best of Rod Stewart & The Faces: The Definitive Collection 1969–1974 Credited to Rod Stewart & The Faces — 2003

17. Gold — 2005

18. The Very Best of Rod Stewart — 2006

19. The Seventies Collection — 2007

20. The Complete American Songbook – Volumes I, II, III & IV — 2007

21. Some Guys Have All the Luck / The Definitive Rod Stewart — 2008

22. The Rod Stewart Sessions 1971–1998 — 2009

23. The Best Of… The Great American Songbook — 2011

24. Rarities — 2013

25. Handbags & Gladrags: The Essential 2018

26. You’re in My Heart: Rod Stewart with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra — 22 November, 2019

 

Conclusion:

Rod Stewart‘s extensive discography spans over five decades, showcasing his versatile talent in rock, pop, and the American songbook. From his debut “An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down” (1969) to recent releases like “The Tears of Hercules” (2021), Stewart’s music has evolved, leaving an indelible mark on the music industry. With iconic albums like “Every Picture Tells a Story” (1971) and “Atlantic Crossing” (1975), Stewart’s legacy as a British music legend is firmly established. His exploration of the Great American Songbook in the early 2000s added yet another dimension to his illustrious career.


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